Civil War Talks on the Life of Jacob Cox, the Battle of Antietam, the Battle of Franklin, and the War in West Virginia

New Book On Sale! Low Price for Only a Few Days.

New book on sale!
Amazon.com and I have begun a sale on my new book, “Lincoln, Antietam and a Northern Lost Cause.” It’s now only $3.99, going up to $5.99 in a couple of days, so act fast: Here is the link: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HV4SSWK

Here is a precis: “What if, even after the Union had won the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln had issued the Emancipation Proclamation, slavery had remained legal in the United States? In this thought-provoking speculative history, written in a “you are there” style using the words of the participants themselves, award-winning Civil War historian Gene Schmiel shows exactly how that ironic and tragic series of events could have happened. He describes how one changed decision at the Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862, could have created a “Civil War butterfly effect” and irrevocably changed American history.”

Buy the Books! Autograph Free!

Both of my books are now available via my author’s page on amazon.com https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HV4SSWK , but if you want an autographed copy of either or both, in paperback format, just e-mail me at geneofva@gmail.com and I would be pleased to sign it for you and send it out.  Just $25 for either, or $40 for both.  What a deal!

cropped-copy-of-lincoln-antietam.jpg9780821420829

“Lincoln, Antietam and a Northern Lost Cause” is Published!

This new book, a speculation on “what if” the Union had won at Antietam, yet slavery did not end,  is now available in both ebook and paperback format.

The book is not written in a traditional narrative format, but rather in a “you are there” approach, using the words of the men who were part of this epic drama.

The nation’s foremost Civil War historian, James McPherson, wrote of it, “I enjoyed your new story of a smashing Union victory at Antietam. the capture of Lee, the death of Jackson and Hood, and the end of the war.  I hope you can find a publisher and an audience…I found it fascinating myself.  Thanks for sharing it with me.”

You can follow these developments and buy the book via my amazon.com author’s web-site,

amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HV4SSWK     

 

cropped-copy-of-lincoln-antietam.jpg   

 

“Lincoln, Antietam and a Northern Lost Cause” is Published!

This new book, a speculation on “what if” the Union had won at Antietam, yet slavery did not end,  is now available in both ebook and paperback format.

The book is not written in a traditional narrative format, but rather in a “you are there” approach, using the words of the men who were part of this epic drama.

The nation’s foremost Civil War historian, James McPherson, wrote of it, “I enjoyed your new story of a smashing Union victory at Antietam. the capture of Lee, the death of Jackson and Hood, and the end of the war.  I hope you can find a publisher and an audience…I found it fascinating myself.  Thanks for sharing it with me.”

You can follow these developments and buy the book via my amazon.com author’s web-site,

amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HV4SSWK     

 

cropped-copy-of-lincoln-antietam.jpg   

 

NEW BOOK COMING!!

New Book Coming!
As some of you know, I have been working on a new book, a “speculative history” of the Battle of Antietam. My thesis is that if the Union had won an overwhelming victory at Antietam, it would have led not only to the defeat of all the Confederate armies, but — and here is the great irony — the preservation of slavery.

Why? Because the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, issued soon after Antietam, allowed the rebel states to return to the Union with slavery intact by January 1, 1863 if they reversed their articles of secession. (That is a segment of that document that most people don’t know about). In my book, the rebel states, their armies devastated, accept Lincoln’s offer. The war and bloodshed are over, but the scourge of slavery remains.

Here is the proposed cover — look for it soon on amazon. com.

Lincoln, Antietam
My New Book — Coming soon on amazon.com

ANTIETAM: GRASPING DEFEAT FROM THE JAWS OF VICTORY: MY UPCOMING TALK TO THE BULL RUN CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE, FEBRUARY 14, 7 PM

Civil war historians have posited that the Union came extremely close to destroying Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia at the Battle of Antietam. Stephen Sears wrote in Landscape Turned Red: The Battle of Antietam, “The major disadvantage of the battlefield as far as the Confederates were concerned was the restricted Potomac crossing at Boteler’s Ford in their rear should they be broken and have to retreat; defeat could easily turn into disastrous rout on the riverbank.” Stephen Woodworth wrote in Davis and Lee at War, “Lee could well face ruin if his line was broken…the decision to accept battle at Antietam was audacity run amok.”

But Lee and his army barely survived, and nearly three more years of bloodshed ensued.

Among the many reasons why the Union did not win was that during the Maryland campaign, McClellan’s command structure was riven by conflict, bad judgment, and rivalries. Unity of command, historian David Hartwig has written, is essential for military success, but, “McClellan set about undoing that” on September 15, just two days before the Battle of Antietam.

My talk on February 14 will discuss the background and implications of the lack of unity of command. Below are images of the key actors:McClellan, Fitz-John Porter, Burnside, and Jacob Cox.George-Mcclellan-Image1200px-Fitz_John_PorterAmbrose_Burnside2general cox

Lee, Longstreet, and Jackson in My Backyard

A few hundred yards from my house in Gainesville, VA, there is an obscure and hidden Civil War “monument” which is likely among the least visited in Virginia.  The three foot high red sandstone edifice has a bronze plaque stating that Lee, Longstreet, and Jackson met there at 12:30 PM on August 29, 1862, just as the Battle of Second Manassas was unfolding.

The monument was erected in 1917 by the Haymarket (VA) Agricultural Club.  Because it was visible at the side of State Route 29 just a few hundred yards from the edge of the battlefield, it was an important tourist site.  However, when the road was widened, the monument was in the median.  That and several car accidents convinced officials to move it in 1985 to a safer — but quite obscure — place inside the neighboring Conway Robinson State Forest.

The monument can still be seen from Route 29, but only if you know it’s there.  Plus there is no place to park.  I’ve driven by this part of “my backyard” hundreds of times, and have never seen anyone visiting the monument.   Now you readers can at least give it a look.

Lee, Longstreet, and Jackson Meeting MarkerLee, Longstreet, and Jackson Meeting Marker